Prop. 46: Drug-testing doctors and raising the cap on ‘pain and suffering’ damages in medical malpractice cases

Stephen Sugarman

Described as a “patient safety” measure, this initiative would do two primary things. First, and the central reason for it being put on the ballot, Prop. 46 would increase from $250,000 to a little over $1 million the amount of money that can be awarded for “pain and suffering” to … More >

A reader weighs in on:

Innocent Bystanders? Monetary Policy and Inequality in the U.S.

D.D. said:

"Thus, the empirical evidence points toward monetary policy actions affecting inequality in the direction opposite to the one suggested by Ron Paul and Austrian economists." Sad to say, this doesn't surprise me at all. I spend a great deal of time in the tech community online, where a disproportionate number of individuals ... More >

When a polling place is someone’s garage, is a ‘redesign’ realistic?

Karin Mac Donald

I read with interest a recent opinion piece for WIRED magazine titled “America’s polling places desperately need a redesign.” In it, author Ted Selker — an inventor, design consultant and member of the Accessible Voting Team at UC Berkeley — describes the physical limitations of many polling places across the … More >

Is there any benefit in overreacting to threats like Ebola?

Martín Sánchez-Jankowski

The recent Ebola scare in the U.S. has raised some important questions about what is the appropriate response to a public threat. The two most obvious ones have to do with what is the appropriate response that we as individuals should take and what is the appropriate response that the … More >

Pollworker 101: How a few crazy hats can make our democracy stronger

Karin Mac Donald

It’s election season in California, which means that the state’s 58 county Registrar of Voters offices are buzzing with activities – everything from designing, printing and mailing ballots to finalizing voter-registration rolls and ordering precinct supplies. Each task that staff in these offices perform factors into an election’s success, and … More >

Innocent Bystanders? Monetary Policy and Inequality in the U.S.

Yuriy Gorodnichenko

Recent popular demonstrations such as the Occupy Wall Street movement have made it clear that the high levels of inequality in the United States remain a pressing concern for many. While protesters have primarily focused their ire on private financial institutions, the Federal Reserve (Fed) has also been one of … More >

Flying blind(ly) into the future

Gene Rochlin

The European airliner manufacturer, Airbus Industrie, recently took out a patent for an airliner design without the usual cockpit up front. Instead, the nose of the airplane would be more streamlined, to reduce air resistance, and the windows removed to save weight. According to the company, this would result in … More >

Africa leaping off-grid

Santiago Miret

Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the least developed areas in the world. According to the World Bank, of the approximately 940 million people living in the region, roughly 600 million lack access to electricity. Moreover, the number of people in Sub-Saharan Africa without electricity has actually been increasing as the population … More >

The Business Model Canvas Gets Even Better – Value Proposition Design

Steve Blank

Product/Market fit now has its own book. Alexander Osterwalder wrote it. Buy it.

The Lean Startup process builds new ventures more efficiently. It has three parts: a business model canvas to frame hypotheses, customer development to get out of the building to test those hypotheses and agile engineering to build minimum viable … More >

What if Ebola isn’t Africa’s biggest health threat?

Malcolm Potts

Over a long professional life in global health, I have learnt a bitter lesson: it seems almost impossible for decision-makers to recognize and respond to slowly unfolding threats that take two or three decades to unfold and can involve millions of people. Sadly, big organizations with big money have a … More >