New Lessons Learned from Berkeley and Stanford Lean LaunchPad Classes

Steve Blank

Our Stanford and Berkeley Lean LaunchPad classes are over for this year, and as usual we learned as much from teaching the teams as the teams did from us.

Here are a few of the Lessons Learned from these two classes.

Have each team talk to 10 customers before the class starts
Each year we … More >

A reader weighs in on:

What do average Americans think about inequality?

Gary said:

Most Americans have a conundrum about inequality - I think a lot of people think they will be rich someday, and in general, most Americans detest taxes. The reality is that most Americans will never be rich, and actually over the last 30 years taxes on income for the wealthiest ... More >

What do average Americans think about inequality?

Claude Fischer

Now that economic inequality has become a focus of attention – mentions of “income inequality” in the New York Times went up five-fold in the 2010s compared to the 2000s, 200-fold compared to the 1990s – we know a few things about it clearly. For example: American inequality is unusually great among … More >

It’s time to refocus California’s climate strategy

Severin Borenstein

You know this already, but let’s review:

Climate change is a global emissions problem.
California produces about 1% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.
Over the next few decades, the majority of emissions will come from developing countries.
If we don’t solve the problem in the developing world, we don’t solve the problem.

And lastly,

The … More >

Russia-West relationship: The Long Telegram revisited

Yuriy Gorodnichenko

The Russian invasion into Crimea sent the Russia-West relationship to the lowest point in a long time and many commentators talk about the return of the Cold War: although Russian media talked about turning America into radioactive dust, few want to have a military conflict in Europe and yet the Russian aggression has … More >

The Future of Tunisia (and the Arab Spring)

Riddhi Dasgupta

The President’s pledge of $500 million to Tunisia has been a subject of some discussion. Surely, this monetary pledge was a show of support and encouragement to the fresh face of Tunisia.

This U.S. commitment may have been partially influenced by Tunisia’s soul-searching and new constitutionalism. The cradle of the Arab … More >

Today’s jobs report and the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon debacle

Robert Reich

What does the Supreme Court’s McCutcheon decision this week have to do with today’s jobs report, showing 192,000 new jobs for March?

Connect the dots. More than five years after Wall Street’s near meltdown the number of full-time workers is still 4 million less than it was in December 2007, yet the … More >

The most brazen invitation to oligarchy in Supreme Court history

Robert Reich

This is no April Fool’s joke. Today, in a 5-4 decision written by Chief Justice John Roberts, the Supreme Court in “McCutcheon vs. Federal Election Commission,” went beyond “Citizen’s United” to strike down overall limits on how much an individual may contribute in one election cycle to innumerable federal candidates … More >

Which radical ideas come true?

Claude Fischer

It’s 1974. Richard Nixon resigns the presidency; Barbara Streisand is singing, “The Way We Were” all over the radio (that music-playing thing before the internet); and you could buy a hand calculator that could only add, subtract, multiply, and divide for, in today’s currency, $100. Someone asks you: Here are three pretty … More >

How Bit Met Watt

Santiago Miret

With the miniaturization of electronics, the world’s computing capabilities exploded, while the energy required to produce bits of data continued to drop. The world was creating more and bits of data, which required less and less watts to operate. As the computing devices became smaller, we went from room-sized computer … More >