Business & Economics

David Zilberman Dining in Slovakia – and thinking about food security

I arrived in Bratislava to participate in a workshop for FoodSecure, a EU project on food and nutritional security in the developing world. Bratislava is the capital of the young republic of Slovakia. It is only 60 kilometers from Vienna, and has a rich and turbulent history of its own. … More >

Brad DeLong Who’s better off, ‘Paris of the Plains’ or ‘Stumptown’? A cost-of-living puzzler

Each time I go directly from Kansas City, Mo./Kan. to Portland, OR — or from Portland, Ore. to Kansas City, Kan./Mo. — I am struck by cognitive dissonance.

There is a very large gulf between what I see around me and what, say, the charts people put up on the screen for … More >

Steve Blank Getting to ‘Yes’ for Corporate Innovation

I’ve been working with Roberto, the Chief Innovation Officer of a diversified company I’ll call Sprocket Industries.

I hadn’t heard from Roberto in awhile and when we caught up, it was clear his initial optimism had faded. I listened as Roberto listed the obstacles to the new innovation program at Sprocket, … More >

Steve Blank Fear of Failure and Lack of Speed In a Large Corporation

I just spent a day working with Bob, the Chief Innovation Officer of a very smart large company I’ll call Acme Widgets.

Bob summarized Acme’s impediments to innovation. “At our company we have a culture that fears failure. A failed project is considered a negative to a corporate career. As a … More >

Severin Borenstein Keystone XL, energy policy and the job-creation shuffle

Renewable energy proponents and advocates of the Keystone pipeline finally agree on something: that the right way to count “job creation” is to focus narrowly on the jobs in the industry they want to boost and ignore the overall impact on employment.  Unfortunately, researchers who actually study employment are not … More >

Robert Reich Trade deals boost those at the top, bust the rest

Suppose that by enacting a particular law we’d increase the U.S.Gross Domestic Product. But almost all that growth would go to the richest 1 percent.

The rest of us could buy some products cheaper than before. But those gains would be offset by losses of jobs and wages.

This is pretty much … More >

Don Moore Courageous Leaders Admit Uncertainty

The expression of confidence is intimately tied up with leadership. Would-be leaders are careful to present a confident face because it helps gain them credibility and convince others that they know what they are doing.

When George W. Bush faced John Kerry in their first Presidential debate in 2004, Bush criticized … More >

Robert Reich The share-the-scraps economy

How would you like to live in an economy where robots do everything that can be predictably programmed in advance, and almost all profits go to the robots’ owners?

Meanwhile, human beings do the work that’s unpredictable – odd jobs, on-call projects, fetching and fixing, driving and delivering, tiny tasks needed … More >

Steve Blank When Krave Jerky Showed up in Class with a $435,000 Check

I remind my students that I’m teaching them a methodology they can use the rest of their careers, not running an incubator.

Every once in awhile a team ignores my advice and builds a company worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Hershey just bought Krave Jerky, a team in our 2011 Berkeley … More >

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