Business & Economics

Gérard Roland After the Greek ‘NO': Europe quo vadis?

Tsipras won the referendum, but where do we go from now? Most, if not all of my Greek friends, intellectuals I highly respect campaigned for the Yes. I understand many of their concerns. Greece was institutionally not ready to enter the Eurozone.

Greece politics are dysfunctional and clientelistic — there has … More >

Robert Reich Overtime: Finally, a break for the middle class

The U.S. Department of Labor just proposed raising the overtime threshold – what you can be paid and still qualify to be paid “time-and-a-half” beyond 40 hours per week – from $23,600 a year to $50,400.

This is a big deal. Some 5 million workers will get a raise (see video).

Business lobbies are … More >

David Zilberman Ravello: Experiencing and contemplating bioeconomy

I returned this week from Ravello, Italy where I participated in the 19th International Consortium for Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR) conference. Ravello is one of the “100 places you must see before you die”. Located atop Amalfi Bay and near Naples, it is a village full of colorful gardens, magnificent palacios, … More >

Robert Reich Why the Trans-Pacific Partnership is nearly dead

How can it be that the largest pending trade deal in history – a deal backed both by a Democratic president and Republican leaders in Congress – is nearly dead?

The Trans Pacific Partnership may yet squeak through Congress but its near-death experience offers an important lesson.

It’s not that labor unions have … More >

David Zilberman Uri Regev: an unsung hero of resource economics

Uri Regev, a teacher and friend of mine, passed away on April 22 in Israel at the age of 80. Uri grew up in Kibbutz Yagur in Israel, studied economics at Hebrew University and came to Berkeley, where he got his Ph.D. in agricultural economics in 1968. He spent most of … More >

Annette Bernhardt Low-wage jobs are California’s Achilles’ heel

California has a serious low-wage jobs problem, and it’s only gotten worse over the past 15 years.

In a new analysis my colleagues and I found that fully a third of our state’s workers earned low wages in 2014 – less than $13.63 an hour. That’s about 4.8 million workers, the … More >

Robert Reich Nike, Obama and the Trans Pacific Partnership fiasco

On Friday, President Obama chose Nike headquarters in Oregon to deliver a defense of his proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership.

It was an odd choice of venue.

Nike isn’t the solution to the problem of stagnant wages in America. Nike is the problem.

It’s true that over the past two years Nike has added 2,000 good-paying professional … More >

David Zilberman The Fenigstein Effect

Every year during graduation season, I encounter many students who are nervous about the job market. Surprisingly, many worry not only about their technical qualifications, but that they don’t look the part.

Some of these students probably listen to the media and studies that have found that good-looking men are considered … More >

Temina Madon Cracking Open the Social Sciences: Leamer and Rosenthal Strike Again

The demand for transparency in science has never been stronger. Today’s most influential publishers, professional societies, think tanks, and funders are all calling for open and reproducible research.

The U.S. government has recently set new standards for Federally funded studies– and even the private sector has begun releasing data, analyses, … More >

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