Business & Economics

Yuriy Gorodnichenko Will E-commerce Make Prices More Flexible?

Today, it’s hard to imagine the world without the internet. PewResearch Internet Project reports that the internet is used by 87% of American adults, up from 14% in 1995. Apart from changing the way how people communicate, connect, or acquire information, the internet has also changed our shopping habits: with … More >

Carol Galante On housing, good news for families and communities

President Obama’s announcement that the Federal Housing Administration will lower the cost of its home loans by one-half of a percentage point (.50 basis points) should be very welcome news. Home loans will now be within reach for many more hard working and responsible families who have been left on … More >

Gérard Roland Is Putin out to destroy the EU?

By Yuriy Gorodnichenko, Associate Professor of Economics; Gerard Roland, Professor of Economics; and Edward W. Walker, Associate Adjunct Professor of Political Science

Since Russia’s annexation of Crimea, tensions between Russia and the West have not abated. Nonetheless, it has been striking how much support Putin still enjoys in Europe, from intellectuals … More >

David Zilberman Were you paid by Monsanto?

Recently I was interviewed for an article published in California Magazine. It is a well-written article about the controversy surrounding genetically modified organisms (GMOs). I made my usual points: GMOs have actually done much good by reducing commodity prices, increasing yields, saving land and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and improving … More >

Yuriy Gorodnichenko Innocent Bystanders? Monetary Policy and Inequality in the U.S.

Recent popular demonstrations such as the Occupy Wall Street movement have made it clear that the high levels of inequality in the United States remain a pressing concern for many. While protesters have primarily focused their ire on private financial institutions, the Federal Reserve (Fed) has also been one of … More >

Robert Reich Why elite private universities get more government money per pupil

Imagine a system of college education supported by high and growing government spending on elite private universities that mainly educate children of the wealthy and upper-middle class, and low and declining government spending on public universities that educate large numbers of children from the working class and the poor.

You can … More >

Sylvia Allegretto One step up and two steps back

With the release of the (mostly) triennial Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) from the Federal Reserve, it is once again time to look at trends in wealth. The SCF is one of the best sources for data on net worth (assets minus liabilities) in the U.S.

In … More >

Carola Binder The Brazilian election and Central Bank independence

Brazilians will head to the polls on Oct. 5 to vote in a tight presidential race. President Dilma Rousseff’s leading challenger is Socialist Party candidate Marina Silva. A key component of Silva’s economic platform is her support for a more independent central bank. Central bank independence, long a topic of interest to … More >

David Zilberman Economics in the land of lakes, caves, and castles

Slovenia is a small Slavic nation in the middle of Europe, between Latin and Germanic countries (Italy and Austria), and is an embodiment of all three. It has been under Austrian rule for 1000 years, and was freed by Napoleon, who is considered a hero (they have a nice statue … More >

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