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Searching for coexistence of GMO and organics in Amsterdam

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | November 30, 2015

I recently returned from a conference on the co-existence of genetically modified food (GMO) with other food, such as organic. The meeting was on November 17-20 in Amsterdam, which was rainy, cold and windy, an unpleasant departure from the sunny and dry climate of drought-stricken Berkeley that I have grown accustomed to. Fortunately we were … Continue reading »

Are we too optimistic about optimism?

Don Moore, professor, Haas School of Business | November 19, 2015

The $10 billion self-help industry offers to inspire us to be optimistic, confident, and therefore successful. We are buying it. Especially in the U.S., we tend to value optimism. This may be because we think we see evidence of optimism’s power all around us: We see winning athletes attribute their success to confidence; optimistic political … Continue reading »

Beeronomics: I’ll drink to that

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | September 14, 2015

This past week I attended the fourth Beeronomics conference in Seattle. The conference brings together economists and other scientists who work on the economics of beer. The first three conferences were in Europe; this was the first U.S. conference. I was excited about the conference first because of the location: I wanted to see my friends and … Continue reading »

Hacking a corporate culture: Stories, heroes and rituals in startups and companies

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | September 10, 2015

I’ve spent this year working with corporations and government agencies that are adopting and adapting Lean Methodologies. I’ve summarized my learnings in this blog post, and here, here and here and here and put it together in the presentation here. One of the interesting innovation challenges I’ve encountered centers on a company’s culture. While startups … Continue reading »

UC Berkeley and IDB partner to improve impact evaluation of projects

Alexandra Orsola-Vidal, Global Networks Director, Center for Effective Global Action | September 9, 2015

With over 3,743 investment projects approved during the last five years in Latin America, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is the largest and oldest multilateral lender in the region. In order to address pressing development challenges within the 26 borrowing member countries, the IDB has invested billions in project design, implementation, and evaluation. As a result … Continue reading »

Whither China’s currency?

David Roland-Holst, adjunct professor, agricultural and resource economics | September 2, 2015

While the floors of the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges were awash in red ink, much of the black stuff was being splashed on financial pages to divine the fate of China’s currency, the Renminbi (RMB). Outsiders might care about the currency because of international competitiveness. China cares about it as a matter of international status, aspiring for … Continue reading »

Is burnout the best business model?

Christina Maslach, professor emerita, psychology |

By Christina Maslach and Cristina Banks In the recent New York Times article “Inside Amazon,” Amazon claims that its culture is peculiar. Actually, it is peculiarly American. There is a long history, in many U.S. workplaces, of carving business success out of the dedication and self-sacrifice of workers. As practiced, this model reflects the philosophy of American … Continue reading »

Displacement: The misunderstood crisis

Karen Chapple, Professor, City and Regional Planning | August 28, 2015

When we think of gentrification and displacement, we typically envision a hipster – young, professional, and probably white – in the Mission District or Brooklyn at the peak of the real estate boom. But this archetype, while not inaccurate, is just the tip of the iceberg. Displacement, which is distinct from gentrification, occurs in many … Continue reading »

Why corporate entrepreneurs are extraordinary – the Rebel Alliance

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | August 26, 2015

I’ve spent this year working with corporations and government agencies that are adopting and adapting Lean Methodologies. The biggest surprise for me was getting schooled on how extremely difficult it is to be an innovator inside a company of executors. —– What Have We Lost? I’ve been working with Richard, a mid-level executive in a … Continue reading »

The future of displacement

Karen Chapple, Professor, City and Regional Planning | August 24, 2015

The year is 2030. Protesters gather around yet another apartment building where long-term residents are being evicted to accommodate newcomers. We must be in San Francisco. No, we’re in Oakland. Guess again. It’s Hayward. Or, Concord. Or perhaps, Santa Rosa. In 2030, these and many other Bay Area communities may realize that their neighborhood has … Continue reading »

Is “secular stagnation” a monetary-financial problem or a fundamental technological problem?

Brad DeLong, Brad DeLong | August 8, 2015

Over at Equitable Growth: On about four of the seven days in a week, my view is that the problems lumped under the heading of “secular stagnation” are primarily monetary-financial problems. Now comes Barry Eichengreen to review the case that these problems are at their root instead of also technological-fundamental. And I must say he … Continue reading »

Depression’s advocates

Brad DeLong, Brad DeLong | July 31, 2015

Over at Project Syndicate: Depression’s Advocates: Back in the darker days of late 2008 and 2009, I had one line in my talks that sometimes got applause, usually got a laugh, and always made people more optimistic. Because the North Atlantic had lived through the 1930s, I would say “This time we will not make … Continue reading »

Three challenges: Taking entrepreneurship & innovation education beyond the classroom

Jerome Engel, founding executive director, Lester Center for Entrepreneurship, and adjunct professor, emeritus, Haas School of Business | July 29, 2015

We have made great progress in creating an entrepreneurship and innovation economy – and the university has been a major contributor — but now it is time to do more. In a keynote last week to the 12th Annual European Entrepreneurship Colloquium I focused on three challenges/opportunities for immediate action; reinvigorating innovation strategies of major … Continue reading »

The humiliation of Greece and Tsipras’s fatal mistake

Gérard Roland, E. Morris Cox professor of economics and professor of political science | July 15, 2015

A large part of Europe is still shell-shocked by the “compromise” that was decided in the Sunday, July 12 Eurozone marathon. Without repeating the list of reforms imposed on Greece, they are much harsher than what had been negotiated weeks and months before, even harsher than anything imposed on Greece since the beginning of the crisis. … Continue reading »

Urgently needed: An international initiative on Greece

Gérard Roland, E. Morris Cox professor of economics and professor of political science | July 8, 2015

Do not hold your breath on Sunday’s deadline for credible Greek proposals to come up to unlock the Greek crisis. This is mostly a trap to accelerate Grexit. At best, it is a Pontius Pilates move by German Chancellor Angela Merkel — to wash herself of the responsibility of Greece spiraling into chaos. Let us … Continue reading »

After the Greek ‘NO’: Europe quo vadis?

Gérard Roland, E. Morris Cox professor of economics and professor of political science | July 6, 2015

Tsipras won the referendum, but where do we go from now? Most, if not all of my Greek friends, intellectuals I highly respect campaigned for the Yes. I understand many of their concerns. Greece was institutionally not ready to enter the Eurozone. Greece politics are dysfunctional and clientelistic — there has been fiscal irresponsibility, lack … Continue reading »

Overtime: Finally, a break for the middle class

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | July 2, 2015

The U.S. Department of Labor just proposed raising the overtime threshold – what you can be paid and still qualify to be paid “time-and-a-half” beyond 40 hours per week – from $23,600 a year to $50,400. This is a big deal. Some 5 million workers will get a raise (see video). Business lobbies are already hollering this … Continue reading »

Ravello: Experiencing and contemplating bioeconomy

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | June 28, 2015

I returned this week from Ravello, Italy where I participated in the 19th International Consortium for Applied Bioeconomy Research (ICABR) conference. Ravello is one of the “100 places you must see before you die”. Located atop Amalfi Bay and near Naples, it is a village full of colorful gardens, magnificent palacios, great restaurants, and a modern … Continue reading »

Why the Trans-Pacific Partnership is nearly dead

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | June 16, 2015

How can it be that the largest pending trade deal in history – a deal backed both by a Democratic president and Republican leaders in Congress – is nearly dead? The Trans Pacific Partnership may yet squeak through Congress but its near-death experience offers an important lesson. It’s not that labor unions have regained political power … Continue reading »

Uri Regev: an unsung hero of resource economics

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | June 1, 2015

Uri Regev, a teacher and friend of mine, passed away on April 22 in Israel at the age of 80. Uri grew up in Kibbutz Yagur in Israel, studied economics at Hebrew University and came to Berkeley, where he got his Ph.D. in agricultural economics in 1968. He spent most of his career at Ben Gurion … Continue reading »