Science & Technology

Gene Rochlin Flying blind(ly) into the future

The European airliner manufacturer Airbus Industrie recently took out a patent for an airliner design without the usual cockpit up front.  Instead, the nose of the airplane would be more streamlined, to reduce air resistance, and the windows removed to save weight.  According to the company, this would result in … More >

David Presti Hail and farewell to a legendary Cal grad

Alexander “Sasha” Shulgin, renowned graduate of UC Berkeley, died on June 2, 2014, a few days short of his 89th birthday. Shulgin was born in Berkeley on June 17, 1925. Both his parents were teachers. He received his bachelor’s degree (1949) and his doctorate in biochemistry (1955) from UC Berkeley. … More >

Jeremy Adam Smith The year’s most popular articles about the “science of a meaningful life”

At a recent retreat for the UC Berkeley Greater Good Science Center, one of our advisors looked at a list of our most popular articles to date. “This is all over the place,” he said, referring to the diversity of topics and approaches.

I replied that this is a feature, not … More >

Steve Blank When Product Features Disappear – Amazon, Apple, Tesla and the Troubled Future for 21st Century Consumers

One of the great innovations of the 21st century are products that are cloud-connected and update and improve automatically. For software, gone are the days of having to buy a new version of physical media (disks or CD’s.) For hardware it’s the magical ability to have a product get better over time as … More >

David Patterson The Eight Commandments to building a bad research center

After being involved in a dozen centers over nearly 40 years at UC Berkeley, I decided to capture my advice on building and running research centers. Following the precedent of my past efforts at “How to Give a Bad Talk” and “How to Have a Bad Career,” I wrote a short technical report … More >

Claude Fischer Cell phone science

My attention was recently drawn to the topic of cell phones and not just because … hold on a sec … um, no messages … of the phone sitting next to my keyboard, but because I was reading two books … wait, what’s the ball score? … No change … … More >

Jeremy Adam Smith Beyond cuddling: Five surprising ways Oxytocin shapes your social life

It’s been called the cuddle hormone, the holiday hormone, the moral molecule, and more—but new research suggests that oxytocin needs some new nicknames. Like maybe the conformity hormone, or perhaps the America-Number-One! molecule.

Where does this many-monikered neuropeptide come from? Scientists first found it in mothers, whose bodies flood with oxytocin … More >

Michael Eisen Open access is not the problem – my take on Science’s peer review “sting”

In 2011, after having read several really bad papers in the journal Science, I decided to explore just how slipshod their peer-review process is. I knew that their business depends on publishing “sexy” papers. So I created a manuscript that claimed something extraordinary - that I’d discovered a species of bacteria that … More >

Michael Eisen NASA paywalls first Curiosity rover papers; I am setting them free

The Mars Curiosity rover has been a huge boon for NASA – tapping into the public’s fascination with space exploration and the search for life on other planets. Its landing was watched live by millions of people, and interest in the photos and videos it is collecting is so great, … More >

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