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Despite surprising Apple vulnerability, journalists should stick with iPhones

Geoffrey King, gking | August 29, 2016

(The following post is reprinted from a post by Geoffrey King for a blog for the Committee to Protect Journalists, covered by Creative Commons.) A rare and serious vulnerability in Apple’s iOS operating system has been discovered by researchers at the University of Toronto’s Citizen Lab, which just published a report detailing its findings. It … Continue reading »

Clusters, class, culture and unfair advantages

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | August 19, 2016

I just finished reading J.D. Vance’s excellent book Hillbilly Elegy, and had that funny feeling when you find the story arc of someone else’s life eerily paralleling yours. Vance’s book and the story of my own life suggest that there is an archetypal journey (a pattern of human nature) that describes the flight from a … Continue reading »

DCPP goes but spent fuel remains

Gene Rochlin, professor emeritus, Energy & Resources Group | July 1, 2016

Ever since PG&E formally announced its intention to close down the Diablo Canyon Power Plant (DCPP) in 2025, two general threads of public response have been manifested. One thread, characterized, inter alia, by a recent Michael Schellenberger OpEd in The New York Times argues that solar and wind power will not suffice to fill the … Continue reading »

Periscope, Congress and the aliveness of video

Nancy Van House, professor emerita in the School of Information | June 29, 2016

A group of people sitting on the floor, many holding signs. One after another making speeches. People milling about. Some looking at their phones. On and off, chanting, call and response. But this time the men are in suits the women mostly in skirts and heels. (No doubt some wishing they had worn pants that … Continue reading »

Humanitarian innovation: Surprising news, cautionary tales, promising directions

Camille Crittenden, deputy director, CITRIS | March 16, 2016

For those fleeing active conflict zones, natural disasters, or the gradual devastation of climate change, a host of humanitarian relief agencies is standing by. A symposium of leaders from the United Nations, nonprofit organizations, academia, and industry gathered last month at CITRIS (Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society) and the Banatao … Continue reading »

The best Greater Good articles of 2015

Jeremy Adam Smith, Editor, Greater Good Magazine | January 4, 2016

For UC Berkeley’s Greater Good, nuance and controversy defined 2015. Over the course of the year, the online magazine of the Greater Good Science Center grappled with big public issues like terrorism, racism, and what schools should teach. We tackled “inside baseball” questions about the validity of psychological research and the best ways to measure … Continue reading »

The international summit on human gene editing

Charis Thompson, chair, Gender and Women's Studies | December 7, 2015

An International Summit on Human Gene Editing, co-hosted by the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine, the UK’s Royal Society and the Chinese Academy of Sciences, took place Dec. 1 to 3, 2015. We speakers were charged with addressing the scientific and ethical challenges posed by the new accurate and accessible genome … Continue reading »

How to prevent gentrification and displacement in the fight against climate change

Miriam Zuk, director, Urban Displacement Project | September 29, 2015

Where you live makes a big difference in your access to public transit, and to opportunities. Right now, all over the state, we’re seeing displacement and gentrification; lower-income people are being pushed out of their neighborhoods and away from that access. Though this is particularly salient in the San Francisco Bay Area market, it can … Continue reading »

The campaign for real social science

Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations | September 7, 2015

Where is the science in the social sciences? In recent decades, the social sciences have been reduced to social studies. This is not just a matter of literacy. Teaching the “social sciences” as mere “social studies” is to the detriment of (ironically) society. Academic programs that call themselves “social scientific” but ignore the science inevitably … Continue reading »

How we changed the way the U.S. government commercializes science: Errol Arkilic — Part 1 of Episode 6 on Sirius XM Channel 111

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | July 20, 2015

My guests on Bay Area Ventures on Wharton Business Radio on Sirius XM Channel 111 were: Errol Arkilic, former program director for the National Science Foundation Innovation Corps (NSF I-Corps), now founder of M34 Capital Steve Weinstein, CEO of MovieLabs Venk Shukla, president TiE Silicon Valley and general partner, Monta Vista Capital In my interview … Continue reading »

A giant leap for science

Temina Madon, executive director, Center for Effective Global Action | June 25, 2015

This week the scientific community takes a major step forward, with the publication of a set of flexible but ambitious guidelines for the open reporting of research findings. The guidelines, intended for adoption by academic journals in all disciplines, were developed by the Transparency and Openness Committee (TOP) and published in Science this week: TOP … Continue reading »

In Honor of Tax Day, Celebrate the Internet

Camille Crittenden, deputy director, CITRIS | April 14, 2015

Benjamin Franklin famously quipped about the only two certainties in life: death and taxes. Tax policy, a reflection of social values and priorities, is inherently contentious in a state as large and diverse as California, much less the United States overall. Although most taxpayers agree on the necessity of collective contributions to services like schools, roads, … Continue reading »

Science vs. religion… or science and religion?

Claude Fischer, professor of sociology | March 26, 2015

Many of America’s cultural battles in recent decades seem to be face-offs between science and faith: over the teaching of evolution, the reality of climate change, the value of stem cell research, the personhood status of an embryo, and the so on. Many on the liberal side of these issues see the controversies as part … Continue reading »

Happy International Day of Happiness!

Jeremy Adam Smith, Editor, Greater Good Magazine | March 20, 2015

Today is the International Day of Happiness, launched last year by the United Nations to promote subjective well-being as a legitimate goal of public policy and social progress. That’s a goal we share at the UC Berkeley Greater Good Science Center, and through the years we’ve covered happiness research from every conceivable angle. Here are … Continue reading »

Blowing up the Business Plan at U.C. Berkeley Haas Business School

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | March 3, 2015

During the Cold War with the Soviet Union, science and engineering at both Stanford and U.C. Berkeley were heavily funded to develop Cold War weapon systems. Stanford’s focus was Electronic Intelligence and those advanced microwave components and systems were useful in a variety of weapons systems. Starting in the 1950’s, Stanford’s engineering department became “outward … Continue reading »

Privacy vs. privacy

Lisa Ho, campus privacy officer | February 27, 2015

It’s common to see privacy pitted against security in the form of the question: “How much privacy are we willing to give up for security?” Some call the security vs. privacy debate a false choice, and suggest the debate is actually liberty vs. security, or liberty vs. control, or privacy vs. cooperation. At UC Berkeley, … Continue reading »

Life Science Startups Rising in the UK

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | February 19, 2015

Stephen Chambers spent 22 years in some of the most innovative companies in life science as the director of gene expression and then as a co-founder of his own company. Today he runs SynbiCITE, the UK’s synthetic biology consortium of 56 industrial partners and 19 Academic institutions located at Imperial College in London. Stephen and … Continue reading »

What Do I Do Now? The Startup Lifecycle

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | February 12, 2015

Last week I got a call from Patrick an ex-student I hadn’t heard from for 8 years. He was now the CEO of a company and wanted to talk about what he admitted was a “first world” problem. Over breakfast he got me up to date on his life since school (two non-CEO roles in … Continue reading »

It’s About Women Running Startups

Steve Blank, lecturer, Haas School of Business | January 22, 2015

Just before the holidays I had coffee with Anne, an ex MBA student running a fairly large product group at a search engine company, now out trying to raise money for her own startup. She had an interesting insight: existing content/media companies were having the same problem as hardware companies that rarely made the leap … Continue reading »