All posts in tag: carbon pricing

Severin Borenstein It’s time to refocus California’s climate strategy

You know this already, but let’s review:

Climate change is a global emissions problem.
California produces about 1% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.
Over the next few decades, the majority of emissions will come from developing countries.
If we don’t solve the problem in the developing world, we don’t solve the problem.

And lastly,

The … More >

Severin Borenstein In defense of picking winners

Virtually all economists working on climate change agree that we should price greenhouse-gas emissions.  Doing so creates an incentive to reduce emissions without the government directing specific technology adoptions or activity changes, that is, without “picking winners.”

Nearly as many economists agree that we should subsidize basic R&D.  Doing so, accelerates … More >

Severin Borenstein Putting a collar on carbon prices

When it was launched in 2005, the European Union cap and trade program for greenhouse gases (known as the Emissions Trading System or EU-ETS) was a bold and important step in addressing climate change.  But from the beginning, the EU-ETS has often been a painful learning experience, much of the … More >

Severin Borenstein What’s Keystone XL got to do with it?

Let’s face it. The opposition to the Keystone XL pipeline isn’t about dirty oil. It’s about oil. James Hansen and the other leading opponents focus on the greenhouse gases is that will be released when all of the oil in the Canadian tar sands (Canada’s relabeling as “oil sands” just … More >

Catherine Wolfram Tipping points and the social cost of carbon

Economists talk about something called the “social cost of carbon.” Here’s the basic idea: You may pay for the gas you put in your car, but when you burn it, you emit carbon dioxide, which imposes costs on the rest of society by accelerating the pace of climate change. The … More >

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