All posts in tag: energy

Dan Farber Does the Keystone XL pipeline matter?

Many people who have studied the issue tell me that the Keystone XL issue is mostly symbolic, because the Alberta oil sands are going to be used one way or another.  But I’m having some second thoughts because of arguments made (here) by Berkeley economist Max Aufhammer. He’s a pretty hard-headed … More >

Severin Borenstein It’s time to refocus California’s climate strategy

You know this already, but let’s review:

Climate change is a global emissions problem.
California produces about 1% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.
Over the next few decades, the majority of emissions will come from developing countries.
If we don’t solve the problem in the developing world, we don’t solve the problem.

And lastly,

The … More >

Dan Farber Biofuels and food prices

Berkeley economist Brian Wright has a disquieting article in the Winter 2014 issues of the Journal of Economic Perspectives, which just crossed my desk. JEP is published by the American Economic Association and is a great resource for those of us who are interested in economics but aren’t professional economists. This article is a case in … More >

Maximillian Auffhammer Not building Keystone XL will likely leave a billion barrels of bitumen in the ground

I am not a fan of blanket statements. Whenever oil sands come up in casual conversation, many of my economist friends argue that “the stuff will come out of the ground whether we like it or not”. When the discussion turns to Keystone XL, the general attitude is that “it … More >

Santiago Miret Where the water flows

California is currently experiencing a historic drought, one of the worst the state has had in over 100 years. The large amount of news coverage about the drought has instilled the notions water usage and water efficiency in the minds of regular consumers. Yet, when taking a closer look at where water … More >

Santiago Miret Electric cars go cross-country

A common anxiety among potential electric vehicle (EV) drivers is being stranded in the middle of the road with an empty battery and no possibility of recharging. Similarly, another concern is that electric cars do not have enough range to sustain longer road trips.

Tesla Motors’ Model S, which has an … More >

Dan Farber When cooking can kill

Cooking dinner, as it turns out, is one of the most serious public health and environmental problems in the world. There’s a common misperception that environmental concerns are just a First World luxury.  But the cookstove example shows that the global poor, too, are in need of better, more efficient, … More >

Steven Weissman Ten energy stories to watch in 2014

In our energy law classes at Cal, we like to start the day by talking about Energy in the News. The media never fails us. Every day, there are multiple energy-related stories of significance touching on resource development, new technologies, policy shifts, jobs, regional politics, prices, international relations, or the … More >

Daniel Kammen Good electricity grids make good neighbors

In the poem “Mending Wall,” Robert Frost asserted that “good fences make good neighbors.”  World history is replete with foreign policy built around physical walls, from Emperor Hadrian, to the Great Wall of China, to the Berlin Wall, the wall between Palestine and Israeli, to the US-Mexico border.  Containment and isolation … More >

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