All posts in tag: energy economics

Meredith Fowlie One university’s attempt to reduce energy waste at work

If you work outside your home, chances are you don’t pay (directly) for the energy you use at work. At my place of work, the UC Berkeley campus, most employees never see – let alone pay – their energy bills.

Of course, there are plenty of pro-social reasons to be conscientious … More >

Severin Borenstein Keystone XL, energy policy and the job-creation shuffle

Renewable energy proponents and advocates of the Keystone pipeline finally agree on something: that the right way to count “job creation” is to focus narrowly on the jobs in the industry they want to boost and ignore the overall impact on employment.  Unfortunately, researchers who actually study employment are not … More >

Severin Borenstein It’s time to refocus California’s climate strategy

You know this already, but let’s review:

Climate change is a global emissions problem.
California produces about 1% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions.
Over the next few decades, the majority of emissions will come from developing countries.
If we don’t solve the problem in the developing world, we don’t solve the problem.

And lastly,

The … More >

Maximilian Auffhammer Why the cool kids are flocking to energy and not water economics

Why do kids like to go to birthday parties? Because there is lots of sugar and other kids. Academic economists are not that different. Energy economics has attracted a lot of new bright minds, both young and not so young. The reason is simple: It’s an important topic; the people … More >

Severin Borenstein In defense of picking winners

Virtually all economists working on climate change agree that we should price greenhouse-gas emissions.  Doing so creates an incentive to reduce emissions without the government directing specific technology adoptions or activity changes, that is, without “picking winners.”

Nearly as many economists agree that we should subsidize basic R&D.  Doing so, accelerates … More >

Severin Borenstein Is demonizing ‘big carbon’ a strategy or a cop-out?

Are we really being tricked, bullied or seduced into burning fossil fuels?  That seems to be the message behind two arguments made recently by prominent advocates for climate action: we should blame the producers of fossil fuels for the failure to make progress on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The Union of Concerned … More >

Catherine Wolfram How California’s K-12 schools can teach us about energy efficiency

California has long been a leading indicator of national energy-efficiency trends. The state passed minimum efficiency standards for refrigerators in 1976, 11 years before the federal government adopted similar standards. And, the recent Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards are based on legislation passed in California several years earlier.

The state is about … More >

Severin Borenstein What (if anything) to do about California gasoline price spikes

Here we go again.  A couple refinery disruptions, a pipeline shutdown, and before you know it gas prices in California have jumped more than 50 cents compared to the rest of the country.  Soon politicians will be wringing their hands and calling for investigations.  Some will blame it on evil … More >

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