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Searching for coexistence of GMO and organics in Amsterdam

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | November 30, 2015

I recently returned from a conference on the co-existence of genetically modified food (GMO) with other food, such as organic. The meeting was on November 17-20 in Amsterdam, which was rainy, cold and windy, an unpleasant departure from the sunny and dry climate of drought-stricken Berkeley that I have grown accustomed to. Fortunately we were … Continue reading »

Corporate space and the Monsanto case

Stephen Menendian, assistant director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society | February 22, 2013

The Supreme Court is currently reviewing a lawsuit by the agri-business giant Monsanto against an Indiana farmer.  In Bowman v. Monsanto, 75-year old Vernon Hugh Bowman has petitioned the Supreme Court to review Monsanto’s lawsuit against him for purchasing and planting seeds that apparently contained Monsanto’s patent protected anti-herbicide genome in them.  Bowman purchased the … Continue reading »

Lessons from Prop 37 and the future of genetic engineering in agriculture

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | December 20, 2012

I was a strong opponent of Proposition of 37 and I am quite satisfied that it did not pass; but its failure serves more than vindication. It has interesting implications for the attitude of California on environmental issues, the future of GMOs, and the future of technology in general. The truth is that I was … Continue reading »

Prop 37 and the right to know nothing

Michael Eisen, Professor of molecular and cell biology | October 26, 2012

As we approach election day, my neighborhood in Berkeley has sprouted dozens of blue and orange yard signs supporting Proposition 37, which would require the labeling of genetically modified foods. The “Right to Know” has become the rallying cry of the initiative’s backers, who meet any criticism of the initiative, its motivation or of the … Continue reading »