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The European Union is NOT good for security

Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations | March 12, 2016

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s announcement on Feb. 20 of a “special status” for the United Kingdom in the European Union (EU) briefly boosted support for staying in — if only because he dominated the news. However, support will decline before the referendum on June 23, particularly on the issue of “national security,” which he falsely offered … Continue reading »

Behind the Republican implosion

Lawrence Rosenthal, executive director, Center for Right-Wing Studies | February 19, 2016

The profound dysfunction on display in the Republican party’s contest for its 2016 presidential nomination reflects an intra-party civil war that has been simmering for the past 25 years and has now burst out of control. In the year 2000, George W. Bush’s signal political achievement was uniting an already fractious Republican Party behind him … Continue reading »

Why don’t refugees fly?

Beverly Crawford, Professor emerita, Political Science and International and Area Studies | February 11, 2016

On Feb. 11, 2016, efforts to stop refugees from entering the safety of the European Union were militarized. The NATO alliance will immediately move three warships to the Aegean Sea to stop the flow of refugees to Europe. “This is not about stopping or pushing back refugee boats,” NATO’s commander assured us, but rather “to help … Continue reading »

What Trump gets right

john a. powell, director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society | December 15, 2015

How does one make sense of a US presidential candidate calling for the banning of Muslims entering the country and the tracking and profiling of those who live here? How does one make sense of a US Supreme Court justice suggesting that Blacks should not go to top-tier universities? We live in strange times and … Continue reading »

An eight-point plan to repair the U.S.-Mexico border

Michael Dear, professor, city and regional planning | November 4, 2015

Ten years ago, in 2005, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security introduced its Secure Border Initiative (SBI). Today, the Mexico-U.S. wall is a fact of everyday life for millions of people who live in its shadow. Disagreements persist about how effective the border fortifications have been, but two outcomes are certain: the SBI intervention has … Continue reading »

DREAMers and the future of our nation

Robert Birgeneau, professor of physics, former chancellor | October 6, 2015

By Allison Davenport, clinical instructor, UC Berkeley School of Law; and Robert J. Birgeneau, chancellor emeritus, UC Berkeley As the autumn semester begins, thousands of college students are back on campus preoccupied with class schedules, roommates, and pursuing their majors. But undocumented students at our nation’s universities are focused on more pressing concerns. Because they … Continue reading »

Dousing the flames of immigration rhetoric with facts

Michael Dear, professor, city and regional planning | September 16, 2015

The European Union confronts a massive crisis as migrants and refugees flood across its borders. Anti-immigrant sentiment has led Hungary to begin building a fence along its border with Serbia in order to keep migrants out. In response, Mr. Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the European Commission, reminded us that walls won’t work: “We can build … Continue reading »

The immigrant-crime connection

Claude Fischer, professor of sociology | July 23, 2015

Killing at the hands of an illegal alien spurs furious debate about closing borders and deporting the undocumented. It is the year before a presidential election and candidates denounce undocumented immigrants as the conveyors of Mexican violence into our country. When Robert J. Sampson, Harvard sociologist and criminologist, wrote about this news, he was not … Continue reading »

Obama: Do the Right Thing

Lisa García Bedolla, chancellor's professor, education and political science | November 19, 2014

Providing administrative relief for at least six million of the unauthorized immigrants currently in the United States is the right thing for President Obama to do for the country and, most importantly, for the hard-working human beings who have been used as pawns in the immigration debate for far too long. U.S. history is replete … Continue reading »

If voters of color don’t vote on Tuesday, don’t be surprised

Lisa García Bedolla, chancellor's professor, education and political science | November 2, 2014

The New York Times recently published a story on the dramatic advances in campaign data analytics since the 2008 election. According to the Times, “modern political campaigns home in on their key voters with drone-like precision, down to the smallest niche — like Prius-driving single women in Northern Virginia who care about energy issues.” The … Continue reading »

1964 to the present — a personal perspective

Robert Birgeneau, professor of physics, former chancellor | September 22, 2014

During the historic Free Speech Movement period at Berkeley, beginning in the autumn of 1964, I was a graduate student in physics at Yale University. There was no doubt that Berkeley students were playing a leadership role for us all across the country. At Yale, the focus was primarily on civil rights. Racism and its destructive … Continue reading »

Is the U.S. Falling Behind Mexico? News from Ambos Nogales

Michael Dear, professor, city and regional planning | July 29, 2014

In the Mexican border town of Nogales, I sat finishing my lunch when Alma, a Sonoran friend who had been watching the diners, spoke quietly: “That’s something you would never have seen a year ago – Mexican men eating salads.” It was, she explained, because of the rising awareness of diet-related health problems in Mexico, … Continue reading »

Central American Children on the US Border Deserve More

Rosemary Joyce, professor of anthropology | July 16, 2014

The first plane has landed in Honduras, carrying women and children deported from the US earlier this week. Press coverage notes that “U.S. officials said there would be many more.” The L.A. Times report goes on to note that “More than 57,000 unaccompanied minors have sought permission to remain” in the US. And an editorial … Continue reading »

Putting the children’s migration in context

Beatriz Manz, professor of geography and ethnic studies | July 11, 2014

The dramatic surge in the number of Central American children and teenagers entering the US has created considerable concern among many in the United States. Already this year, 52,000 children have been apprehended. The latest estimates indicate that almost 90,000 unaccompanied minors — overwhelmingly from Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras — will be picked-up by the US Border Patrol through this fiscal year ending in September 2014, almost double last year’s total. For … Continue reading »

From the War on Crime to ‘World War Z’: What the zombie apocalypse can tell us about the current state of our culture of fear

Jonathan Simon, professor of law | January 10, 2014

Zombies are everywhere.  Ok not (yet) on the streets (so far as I know); but in our cultural imaginary they are everywhere.  You can find them (in small groups and hordes) in high budget nail biting thriller movies like Brad Pitt’s World War Z (2013), on television, and all over print and digital reading material, much of … Continue reading »

Mass incarceration, mass deportation: Twin legacies of governing through crime

Jonathan Simon, professor of law | December 23, 2013

One afflicts mostly American citizens, disproportionately those of African American and Latino backgrounds from areas of concentrated poverty, but also many white and middle class citizens who fall into the hands of police and prosecutors.  The other afflicts exclusively non-citizens living in the U.S. without federal authorization or in violation of the terms of their … Continue reading »

Postcard from Paris

Claude Fischer, professor of sociology | July 17, 2013

Spending a bit of time in Paris turns your correspondent’s thoughts to America. (It’s an occupational preoccupation). I was particularly struck by these posters in the Metro: The first reads, roughly, “Our ancestors were not all Gauls”; the second, “One French person in four derives from immigration.” Yet another placard shows a 19th-century bricklayer at … Continue reading »

Immigrants and historical amnesia

Claude Fischer, professor of sociology | June 12, 2013

In the debates over social policies, one often hears historical claims roughly along these lines: “Minorities these days want it easy. When my ancestors came they got no help and just did it on their own.” Arguments like this have been raised against programs designed to help African Americans. In his classic 1981 study, A … Continue reading »

Three insights from research about immigrant families

Jeremy Adam Smith, Editor, Greater Good Magazine | April 10, 2013

Everything you think you know about immigrant families is probably wrong. That’s one of the conclusions I took away from the annual meeting of the Council on Contemporary Families, which convenes scholars and writers from around North America to discuss new scientific findings about the family. This year’s conference at the University of Miami focused … Continue reading »