All posts in tag: immigration

Rosemary Joyce Central American Children on the US Border Deserve More

The first plane has landed in Honduras, carrying women and children deported from the US earlier this week. Press coverage notes that “U.S. officials said there would be many more.”

The L.A. Times report goes on to note that “More than 57,000 unaccompanied minors have sought permission to remain” in the … More >

Beatriz Manz Putting the children’s migration in context

The dramatic surge in the number of Central American children and teenagers entering the US has created considerable concern among many in the United States. Already this year, 52,000 children have been apprehended. The latest estimates indicate that almost 90,000 unaccompanied minors — overwhelmingly from Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras — will be picked-up by the US Border Patrol through this fiscal year ending in September 2014, almost … More >

Jonathan Simon From the War on Crime to ‘World War Z’: What the zombie apocalypse can tell us about the current state of our culture of fear

Zombies are everywhere.  Ok not (yet) on the streets (so far as I know); but in our cultural imaginary they are everywhere.  You can find them (in small groups and hordes) in high budget nail biting thriller movies like Brad Pitt’s World War Z (2013), on television, and all over print and … More >

Jonathan Simon Mass incarceration, mass deportation: Twin legacies of governing through crime

One afflicts mostly American citizens, disproportionately those of African American and Latino backgrounds from areas of concentrated poverty, but also many white and middle class citizens who fall into the hands of police and prosecutors.  The other afflicts exclusively non-citizens living in the U.S. without federal authorization or in violation … More >

Claude Fischer Postcard from Paris

Spending a bit of time in Paris turns your correspondent’s thoughts to America. (It’s an occupational preoccupation). I was particularly struck by these posters in the Metro:

The first reads, roughly, “Our ancestors were not all Gauls”; the second, “One French person in four derives from immigration.” Yet another placard shows … More >

Claude Fischer Immigrants and historical amnesia

In the debates over social policies, one often hears historical claims roughly along these lines: “Minorities these days want it easy. When my ancestors came they got no help and just did it on their own.” Arguments like this have been raised against programs designed to help African Americans. In … More >

Jeremy Adam Smith Three insights from research about immigrant families

Everything you think you know about immigrant families is probably wrong. That’s one of the conclusions I took away from the annual meeting of the Council on Contemporary Families, which convenes scholars and writers from around North America to discuss new scientific findings about the family.

This year’s conference at the … More >

Claude Fischer Immigration and political clout

Two hot-button social issues seem to be moving to some sort of political resolution rather quickly. Their stories tell us something about the nature of attitudes Americans hold on such topics and also about the nature of American politics.

One issue is gay marriage. It appears that, whether de jure or … More >

Claude Fischer Tolerating Americans

Given all the furor around “culture war” issues such as gay marriage, prayer in schools, affirmative action, funding of contraception, immigration, and bilingual education, you’d think that Americans were increasingly immersed in virulent intergroup hatred. And yet, over the long haul, the amazing trend has been the increasing tolerance Americans … More >

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