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Keystone Pipeline and the Carbon Tax: A shotgun marriage that can work

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | January 26, 2015

We recently learned that Senators Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) suggested amending a bill that approves the building of the Keystone pipeline and abolishes the corn ethanol mandate. This is a very unwise proposal. If Congress needs a face-saving way to approve the Keystone pipeline, it should be done in a way that … Continue reading »

Why are gas prices so high?

Rosemary Joyce, professor of anthropology | October 16, 2012

The second presidential debate is over. The spinning is going strong. Almost all the journalism seems to be about the contest. And that is too bad, because at a few points, there were actual issues raised that might be worth following through. For example: Republican candidate Mitt Romney argued that a president should be judged … Continue reading »

The gas wars

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | February 21, 2012

Nothing drives voter sentiment like the price of gas – now averaging $3.56 a gallon, up 30 cents from the start of the year. It’s already hit $4 in some places. The last time gas topped $4 was 2008. And nothing energizes Republicans like rising energy prices. Last week House Speaker John Boehner told Republicans … Continue reading »

Alberta’s tar sands a slow-motion equivalent of the Gulf disaster

Steven Weissman, associate director, Center for Law, Energy and the Environment | June 24, 2010

If you were President Obama, what would you do about the tar sands fields in Alberta?  He is being asked to approve or reject a pipeline extension that would carry 900,000 barrels per day of Canadian crude deep into the United States.  It has to be exceedingly tempting to just say “yes”.  After all, Canada … Continue reading »