All posts in tag: parenting

Claude Fischer Work hours and the pay gap

Twenty-five years ago, Berkeley sociologist Arlie Hochschild coined the phrase “stalled revolution” to describe how far American women had come since the 1950s. What she meant (in my reading) is that, although gender relations in America, from workplace to bedroom, had changed radically, the pace of change had slowed tremendously.

The … More >

Jeremy Adam Smith Five ways to encourage giving to disadvantaged public schools

As governments have slashed funding for public education, more and more school districts have turned to parents for help—and parents have responded to the call.

Case in point: In San Francisco, PTA budgets have increased by 800 percent over the past 10 years, according to an investigation I conducted with colleagues … More >

Christine Carter Tablet and smartphone boot camp for middle-school parents

Every day I read something that leads me to believe that tech devices are dramatically affecting our kids’ normal social, sexual, intellectual, and emotional development. What I’m most amazed by, frankly, is how uninvolved we parents tend to be in the online lives of our middle schoolers. Our tweeners tend … More >

Christine Carter Would working less make you happier?

Are you caught in a “Time Bind”— where you feel like you don’t have enough time to get your work done AND spend time with your children and spouse AND take care of your own basic needs?

Sociologists have been very excited about a “natural experiment” occurring in Korea. In 2004, … More >

Christine Carter Working parents, are you maxed out?

I just finished Katrina Alcorn’s gripping memoir, Maxed Out, about her nervous breakdown. Although it is an absorbing, can’t-put-it-down kind of a book, her breakdown — harrowing as it was — struck me as ordinary.

Ordinary in that her experience seems so common. Working parents are stressed. Women in particular are … More >

Christine Carter Influencing teens and tweeners, part 2

In my last post, I introduced the idea of “motivational interviewing,” a way to engage with adolescents to make them feel heard, understood, and, ultimately, receptive to our wisdom.

This technique, which has been proven effective in clinical psychology, is particularly useful when we want to influence our teens or tweeners … More >

Christine Carter How to influence your teen, part 1

I frequently hear complaints from parents that their teenagers — or, more accurately, their adolescents — are irrational.

Kids say they want to get into a good college, for example, but then they miss school because they’ve stayed up half the night watching movies. Or they say they’d like to keep … More >

Christine Carter Essential school supplies that aren’t on your list

Art supplies, a cool thumb-drive, and a new backpack are nothing short of thrilling in my household. We love preparing for school. And like a lot of parents, I assumed for years that success in school would be a safe route to happiness in life.

But a new study, which followed … More >

Christine Carter Fathers have more fun

Are parents happier than their childless peers?

For the last five years or so, I’ve answered that question with a resounding “no.” Statistics (not to mention anecdotal evidence) led me to believe that parents tend to be more stressed and less happy.

In some ways, this seems understandable, even obvious. Folks without … More >

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