Skip to main content

If black lives matter, end the War on Crime

Jonathan Simon, professor of law | December 8, 2014

From the perspective of tens of thousands of protesters around the nation this week, the deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. and Eric Garner in Staten Island reflected an unfathomable decision by white police officers to kill unarmed black men engaged in trivial criminal (if any) behavior. To thousands of police officers (and their families), … Continue reading »

Why Gov. Nixon has to remove prosecutor

Jack Glaser, associate professor of public policy | August 28, 2014

We are a long way from knowing precisely what happened in Ferguson, two weeks ago, but one thing is clear: The town’s name has become yet another synonym for the chasm of experience dividing white and black America. Time and again, young African-American men have been fatally shot by police under ambiguous circumstances: Amadou Diallo, … Continue reading »

Whither the War on Crime? How to respond (and not respond) to January’s string of outrageous murders and attempted murders

Jonathan Simon, professor of law | January 31, 2011

In case anyone has been hiking in desert for the month of January, we are the midst of a wave of frightening murders and attempted murders, including the attempted assassination of Rep. Gabrielle Gifford in Tucson, and in the same incident the murder of a federal judge and three other victims (including a 9-year-old girl) … Continue reading »