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How the tech industry can lead in the Trump era

Sonia Katyal, Chancellor's Professor of Law, Berkeley Center for Law & Technology codirector | November 30, 2016

Co-authored by Simone C. Ross, co-founder and chief program officer at Techonomy. This presidential election has kicked off tempestuous debates and much soul searching about the role of technology, especially social media, in the democratic process. These questions are vital, but now it is time to look forward. The core issue is the question of … Continue reading »

Climate change and the post-election blues

Meredith Fowlie, Associate Professor and Class of 1935 Distinguished Chair in Energy | November 28, 2016

I am living in a very blue state. The graph below charts Google searches for “stages of grief.” The spike in grief-stricken web/soul searching corresponds with — you guessed it — the 2016 election. The map shows where, in the days following the election, these searches were happening. Not surprisingly, post-election blues show up disproportionately … Continue reading »

Is empathy a luxury in the age of Trump?

Jeremy Adam Smith, Editor, Greater Good Magazine | November 15, 2016

The election of Barack Obama marked the emergence of the Tea Party, a radical right-wing movement that challenged the Republican establishment and ultimately fueled the rise of Donald Trump. Where did the Tea Party come from? That’s the question renowned sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild set out to explore in her new book, Strangers in Their Own … Continue reading »

Deciphering election polling, from algorithms and youth votes to the Electoral College

Laura Stoker, professor of political science | November 10, 2016

The outcome of the 2016 general election in the United States was momentous and surprising. Yet some commentaries seem to suggest that means we need to rethink our basic understandings of voters and elections. I disagree, albeit gently, with that kind of hyperbole. Here’s why. Let’s not exaggerate As in 2000, it appears the winner … Continue reading »

Proposition 59, the Citizens United initiative, gets it wrong on corporate civil rights

Larry Rosenthal, adjunct professor, public policy | October 27, 2016

Over-simplification is one of the hallmark symptoms of our beleaguered Election 2016. A campaign by over-simplifiers, seemingly marketed only to distracted, easily manipulated voters. But don’t pretend that any single candidate or party holds a monopoly on over-simplification. California’s Proposition 59 (2016) shows that progressives aren’t immune to the condition. An entirely nonbinding, advisory measure, Prop. 59 … Continue reading »

Emma Goldman Papers sounds the alarm for Nasty Women – past and present – to unite

Candace Falk, Candace Falk | October 24, 2016

Among the most frightening aspects of the specter of a Trump presidency would be the arbitrary use of power, including his threat to “lock up” his “nasty woman” opponent, enact racist policies of massive deportations from, and restricted entry into, the United States, all while bypassing any semblance of the democratic process. This scenario was … Continue reading »

Michelle Obama: ‘It’s about basic human decency’

Rosemary Joyce, professor of anthropology | October 13, 2016

“It has shaken me to my core….” Yes. This resonates. Michelle Obama has just delivered the speech of her life — of the lives of many women who watched events in the presidential election since Friday with an increasing sense of disbelief. How could we possibly, in 2016, have a major party candidate for president who spoke … Continue reading »

Insights from Standing Rock: as school begins

Tasha Hauff, doctoral student and teacher at Sitting Bull College | September 5, 2016

In January this year I moved to Standing Rock Sioux Reservation to take a position at Sitting Bull College teaching Native American Studies, including the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ language. Standing Rock is where I wanted to be because of its incredible work with indigenous language revitalization, particularly its growing PK-2nd grade immersion school. The Sacred Stone … Continue reading »

Trump: Roots of improvisation

Lawrence Rosenthal, executive director, Center for Right-Wing Studies | August 27, 2016

From the very start of his campaign, Donald Trump’s case for his superior qualification for the presidency has rested on his vaunted deal-making ability. Here is an excerpt from a fund-raising email his campaign sent around on August 23: “I’ve built my career…by making great deals. I’m known for it — I even wrote a … Continue reading »

No more Berning of fossil fuels

Maximilian Auffhammer, professor, international sustainable development | March 10, 2016

For the energy sector a lot is at stake with this next election. Of the GOP front runners, only Marco Rubio has an energy or climate plan on his website. A few choice nuggets are doing away with “Obama’s carbon mandates” (whatever that means), approving Keystone XL immediately, rewriting the offshore drilling plan and creating … Continue reading »

Why Trump merits the “f” word

Robert Reich, professor of public policy |

I’ve been reluctant to use the  “f” word to describe Donald Trump because it’s especially harsh, and it’s too often used carelessly. But Trump has finally reached a point where parallels between his presidential campaign and the fascists of the first half of the 20th century – lurid figures such as Benito Mussolini, Joseph Stalin, … Continue reading »

Why Trump?

George Lakoff, professor of linguistics |

Donald Trump is winning Republican presidential primaries at such a great rate that he seems likely to become the next Republican presidential nominee and perhaps the next president. Democrats have little understanding of why he is winning — and winning handily, and even many Republicans don’t see him as a Republican and are trying to … Continue reading »

Election 2016: The long and uncertain path to a Trump victory

Terri Bimes, political science lecturer | February 12, 2016

After his victory in New Hampshire, Donald Trump has shown that he is a real contender for the Republican Party’s nomination. Prediction markets, in which consumers can place bids on who will win the nomination, had soured on Trump following his setback in Iowa. But right now on Predict It, Trump’s shares are worth twice … Continue reading »

Condemning Donald Trump is not enough: The genealogy of demagoguery and Islamophobia

Elsadig Elsheikh, director, global justice program, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society | December 18, 2015

In a widely circulated article in the Atlantic Monthly from 1990, Bernard Lewis wrote about what he perceived as the “The Roots of Muslim Rage,” offering an analysis of the conflicting relationship between “Islam” and the “West.” Lewis wrote “we are facing a mood and a movement far transcending the level of issues and policies … Continue reading »

What Trump gets right

john a. powell, director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society | December 15, 2015

How does one make sense of a US presidential candidate calling for the banning of Muslims entering the country and the tracking and profiling of those who live here? How does one make sense of a US Supreme Court justice suggesting that Blacks should not go to top-tier universities? We live in strange times and … Continue reading »