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Obergefell v. Hodges: A dead-end for LGBT civil rights?   

Stephen Menendian, assistant director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society | May 13, 2015

On April 28, 2015, the Supreme Court heard historic oral argument in a set of consolidated cases styled Obergefell v. Hodges involving state-level same-sex marriage bans.[1]  The parties challenging these laws argue that the same-sex marriage bans are discriminatory by targeting gay people, and are an unconstitutional burden on a fundamental right.  Yet, during the course … Continue reading »

Searching for Equality in Indiana and Beyond

john a. powell, director, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society | April 2, 2015

Throughout the history of our nation, many faith traditions have led on social issues. Religious leaders and faith-based communities played a critical role in the abolitionist movement, suffragist movement, and civil rights movement. Even today, there are vigorous and active communities of faith that speak out publicly to the issues of our time, from #blacklivesmatter … Continue reading »

Which radical ideas come true?

Claude Fischer, professor of sociology | April 1, 2014

It’s 1974. Richard Nixon resigns the presidency; Barbara Streisand is singing, “The Way We Were” all over the radio (that music-playing thing before the internet); and you could buy a hand calculator that could only add, subtract, multiply, and divide for, in today’s currency, $100. Someone asks you: Here are three pretty radical ideas – which do … Continue reading »

The Summer of Rights

Lawrence Cohen, professor of anthropology | June 27, 2013

I was packed in with three Benedictine monks in the crowd last night at the Castro celebrating the two United States Supreme Court decisions earlier that day — for the record,  June 26, 2013. The monks were waving small blue and yellow Human Rights Campaign flags, and like many others I was taking pictures of … Continue reading »

Gay vows

Claude Fischer, professor of sociology | May 22, 2012

Much of the to-do about President Obama’s coming out on gay marriage has focused on (besides the political strategy involved) what it tells us about Americans’ tolerance for homosexuality. Noteworthy as well is what the to-do tells about Americans’ — gay and straight Americans’ — attitudes towards marriage. In same week that the French nonchalantly … Continue reading »