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Break ‘Em Up!

Stephen Maurer, Adj. Em. Prof. of Public Policy | June 20, 2019

Forty years after Ronald Reagan, the antitrust pendulum has swung back. So far most of the discussion has focused on whether Facebook and other tech giants deserve “scrutiny.” But what then? Simply replacing Facebook with a new monopolist would do nothing to make consumers better off. The real question should instead be whether we can … Continue reading »

Creating a National Park System in China

Jonathan Jarvis, Executive Director of the Berkeley Institute for Parks, People and Biodiversity | June 19, 2019

Just over 20 years ago, I visited China representing the US National Park Service and traveled extensively to suggest how China might manage its protected areas. During our tour, I noted that their parks and protected areas, some carrying the National Park moniker, were poorly managed and lacked the professional oversight found in the US … Continue reading »

Reforming Facebook: First, Do No Harm

Stephen Maurer, Adj. Em. Prof. of Public Policy | June 13, 2019

People say that America is a divided society, but there are at least two things we can agree on. First, that nobody likes Facebook’s ability to censor political speech. And second, that it would be incredible if Facebook’s leaders and employees, knowing that they hold such power, were not tempted to use it. From this … Continue reading »

D. Day

Malcolm Potts, professor of population and family planning | June 6, 2019

This is a blog I couldn’t find the way in Please post for me D Day On Tuesday June 6th 1944 I was a small boy attending primary school. I’m sure my parents heard the BBC 9 o’clock news announcing the Normandy invasion, but I was asleep in bed. However, I do have genuine memories … Continue reading »

DDay

Malcolm Potts, professor of population and family planning |

I couldn’t make my password work can you post for me? Today is important.! 510 524 4320 D Day On Tuesday June 6th 1944 I was a small boy attending primary school. I’m sure my parents heard the BBC 9 o’clock news announcing the Normandy invasion, but I was asleep in bed. However, I do … Continue reading »

My annual review 2018

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | December 20, 2018

Towards the end of every year I post a summary of my personal and professional activities. They are intertwined. I hope this summary is enlightening to people who are interested in the university, its people and their ideas. I discuss first personal aspects, and then move to research and academic activities. I am 71 and … Continue reading »

NAFTA’s dark holidays

Harley Shaiken, director, Center for Latin American Studies, professor in education and in geography | December 11, 2018

General Motors’ surprise announcement the Monday after Thanksgiving that it would eliminate 14,000 jobs and shutter five plants sent traumatic shock waves across the industrial Midwest and into Canada, putting a dark cloud over the holiday season. While these changes will affect autoworkers today, they will undoubtedly be felt by all working Americans in the … Continue reading »

Peter Berck RIP — a distinguished scholar and member of the ARE family

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | September 21, 2018

This year we lost Peter Berck, a prominent member of the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics (ARE) and the College of Natural Resources as well as a cherished friend and colleague of mine. Peter was born in New York, fell in love with Berkeley as an undergraduate and after completing his Ph.D. at MIT, … Continue reading »

Exit, voice and loyalty for graduation speakers

Henry Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy | May 16, 2018

This is an edited excerpt from remarks Monday, May 14, at the graduation ceremonies for the Goldman School of Public Policy Public policy analysis deals with the hard problems faced in the public and non-profit sectors where we must bring political values to bear in the most effective way to solve difficult public problems. In … Continue reading »

My annual review 2017

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | December 22, 2017

This year moved very quickly, and it was relatively quiet on a personal level, which is good. I really enjoyed playing with my grandchildren as they grow up. Our sons and daughters-in-law are doing well. Leorah is enjoying her retirement, and maybe one day I’ll join her. She is really creative with her knitwear and … Continue reading »

A holiday message for the Berkeley campus

Carol Christ, Chancellor | December 12, 2017

As the semester winds down and the holidays approach, I want to share with you a few reflections about where we as a campus have been and where we are headed. Please view this short video message for some of these thoughts:  I hope your holiday break is invigorating, and I wish you a very … Continue reading »

Thinking about food, education and change in the land of the Incas

David Zilberman, professor, agriculture and resource economics | December 5, 2017

I first visited Peru 10 years ago and fell in love with the country. I enjoyed Lima’s wonderful coastline and the impressive old city. I will always remember my visit to Machu Picchu, which is one of my top-five favorite global destinations. With coca tea, I survived the altitude of the magnificent Cusco, the capital … Continue reading »

Nationalism and the future of higher education

John Aubrey Douglass, Senior Research Fellow - Public Policy and Higher Education, Center for Studies in Higher Education | November 20, 2017

(These remarks were delivered at the opening of a Nov. 16-17 conference observing the 60th anniversary of UC Berkeley’s Center for Studies in Higher Education, held in partnership with University World News, and exploring the influence of nationalism on major national universities around the world.) With varying levels of intensity, university are extensions of the … Continue reading »

The dangerous data hack that you won’t even notice

Betsy Cooper, Executive Director, UC Berkeley Center for Long-term Cybersecurity |

A recent wave of cyberattacks — from WannaCry and Equifax to the alleged Russian influence on the U.S. election — has demonstrated how hackers can wreak havoc on our largest institutions. But by focusing only on hackers’ efforts to extort money or mess with our political process, we may have been missing what is potentially … Continue reading »

A fall semester update

Carol Christ, Chancellor | November 16, 2017

As we approach the yearly rituals of the season—the Big Game and the holidays—we have an opportunity to reflect on the fall semester. Free Speech and Community Values The semester was an eventful one, as we tried to balance our commitment to free expression with our values as a community. The discussions and conversations we … Continue reading »