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Trump swings a wrecking ball at U.S.-Asia relations

T.J. Pempel, professor of political science | September 13, 2017

Few analysts in the United States or East Asia anticipated the speed with which the Trump administration would swing a wrecking ball into the complex and longstanding machinery of the United States’ relations with the Asia Pacific. Yet in its first six months, it is well on its way to eviscerating many of the most … Continue reading »

Canada should welcome America’s ‘dreamers’

Irene Bloemraad, professor of sociology | August 29, 2017

By Irene Bloemraad and Ratna Omidvar This commentary is reposted from The Globe and Mail in Canada, where it originally appeared in February 2017. We are now witnessing the casualties of new United States policies arriving at Canadian borders. More might soon follow as those who lack residence documents face a grim future and the … Continue reading »

On sexism in economics

Emily Eisner, eeisner | August 24, 2017

An undergraduate honors thesis written by UC Berkeley economics major Alice Wu exposes the rampant misogyny cluttering Economics Job Market Rumors, an anonymous forum.

On statues, and what can and cannot be said

Andrew Shanken, professor of architecture | August 18, 2017

I’ve been loath to write about what’s happening with Confederate statues, but a few sleepless nights cured my diffidence. As an architectural historian who works on memorials and has dabbled in the history of historic preservation, I’ve vacillated over the years between a Ruskinian position (“let it moulder”) and a Rieglian position, trying to establish … Continue reading »

Lessons from the London high-rise fire

Michael O'Hare, professor of public policy | June 16, 2017

Every catastrophe has multiple causes, so there will be lots to learn about this one as the facts come in. Whatever they are, they will include irresponsible, probably corrupt, behavior by people who should have known better.

Lessons from the movement for marriage in a fractious age

Martin Meeker, mmeeker | April 10, 2017

The jury is still out with regard to what the Trump administration will mean for hard-won protections for lesbians, gay men and transgender people. Surely no one is anticipating an expansion of protections, such as the passage of the long-proposed Employment Nondiscrimination Act, so the question is asked in terms of how much retrenchment can … Continue reading »

Sincerely, Niccolo Machiavelli: an open letter to Donald Trump

Peter Sahlins, professor of history | February 26, 2017

“I must commend you on your masterful victory over your opponents. But some of my lessons you’ve failed to learn.” So wrote Liam Frölund, a freshman at Berkeley, using Machiavelli’s voice and texts, in a masterly fulfillment of his class assignment, published last week in Salon Magazine. I’ve been teaching History 5, “Western Civilization Since … Continue reading »

Emma Goldman Papers sounds the alarm for Nasty Women – past and present – to unite

Candace Falk, Candace Falk | October 24, 2016

Among the most frightening aspects of the specter of a Trump presidency would be the arbitrary use of power, including his threat to “lock up” his “nasty woman” opponent, enact racist policies of massive deportations from, and restricted entry into, the United States, all while bypassing any semblance of the democratic process. This scenario was … Continue reading »

Michelle Obama: ‘It’s about basic human decency’

Rosemary Joyce, professor of anthropology | October 13, 2016

“It has shaken me to my core….” Yes. This resonates. Michelle Obama has just delivered the speech of her life — of the lives of many women who watched events in the presidential election since Friday with an increasing sense of disbelief. How could we possibly, in 2016, have a major party candidate for president who spoke … Continue reading »

Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement joins call for civility, presidential debate standards

Larry Rosenthal, adjunct professor, public policy | September 16, 2016

Today the Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement at the Goldman School of Public Policy joined the National Institute for Civil Discourse in calling on the presidential debate moderators to adopt a set of standards to ensure that the 2016 presidential debates are fair, informative and civil. We are among more than 60 organizations signing on … Continue reading »

Defeating the Islamic State in the fifth dimension

Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations |

This is a confusing summer for watchers of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant/Syria (ISIL, ISIS, or Da’esh): Its territorial state is shrinking, while ISIL is inspiring unprecedented lethality and frequency of terrorism in other states. These trends have been offered as false promises for the decline of ISIL, but to be realistic, we should … Continue reading »

Insights from Standing Rock: as school begins

Tasha Hauff, doctoral student and teacher at Sitting Bull College | September 5, 2016

In January this year I moved to Standing Rock Sioux Reservation to take a position at Sitting Bull College teaching Native American Studies, including the Očhéthi Šakówiŋ language. Standing Rock is where I wanted to be because of its incredible work with indigenous language revitalization, particularly its growing PK-2nd grade immersion school. The Sacred Stone … Continue reading »

Trump: Roots of improvisation

Lawrence Rosenthal, executive director, Center for Right-Wing Studies | August 27, 2016

From the very start of his campaign, Donald Trump’s case for his superior qualification for the presidency has rested on his vaunted deal-making ability. Here is an excerpt from a fund-raising email his campaign sent around on August 23: “I’ve built my career…by making great deals. I’m known for it — I even wrote a … Continue reading »

Which road for Britain?

Mark Bevir, professor of political science | June 26, 2016

The woman on the TV was explaining why she had voted for Britain to leave the European Union: “My parents fought the Second World War for our freedom.” Alas, my own parents died when I was younger, so I can’t ask them, but I suspect they would not share this view of the war. I … Continue reading »

Brexit: A cousin of Trumpism? A distant cousin of fascism?

Lawrence Rosenthal, executive director, Center for Right-Wing Studies | June 25, 2016

June 24, 2016: I spoke to my friend in Britain this morning. Still absorbing the shock that her nation had voted itself out of Europe, she said, “Today I live in a different country.” I recognized the sentiment. It was widespread in this country, the USA, in the wake of 9-11. When people said, “Everything … Continue reading »

Immigrants, Brexit, Trump and inequality

Irene Bloemraad, professor of sociology | June 24, 2016

“I’m confused,” my brother emailed me this morning. “Why is fear dictating decisions around the world? First Trump, now Brexit. I need a professor of sociology to help me understand what is going on.” Unlike doctors or car mechanics, people rarely ask for my professional advice. Younger brothers are even less apt to ask for … Continue reading »

Britain is leaving the EU: What happens next?

Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations |

The British voted on 23 June to leave the European Union (EU). The result was confirmed early in the morning of 24 June, British time. What happens next? I have the following ten forecasts and predictions: Britain will leave the EU Don’t be in any doubt, Britain will leave the EU. The result is decisive … Continue reading »

After Orlando: Let’s keep the focus on anti-LGBT violence

Rosemary Joyce, professor of anthropology | June 16, 2016

Like many Americans, I was energized and grateful for the senators who spent over half a day yesterday speaking from the heart about their dismay at our national inability to enact even the simplest reforms on gun ownership. Motivated by the deaths of 49 people, and the wounding of dozens more, in Orlando this weekend, … Continue reading »

Why the media have been greasing Trump’s wheels

Edward Wasserman, former dean, Graduate School of Journalism | April 1, 2016

How to explain the indispensable role of the news media in lubricating the unfathomable rise of Donald Trump? It can’t be favoritism. I venture to say that a survey of U.S. journalists, taken at the start of the primary season, would have found but infinitesimal support for the idea that Trump was a plausible, let … Continue reading »