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Fear not. Trump cannot dispute the vote indefinitely

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | November 15, 2020

The president can bluster and protest all he wants, but like it or not, the Constitution and federal law establish a clear timeline of how electoral votes are processed, and when the new president takes office. Here’s how that process normally plays out, how Trump might try to undermine it, and why he is unlikely to succeed.

How will Joe Biden heal the country if Trump keeps tearing us apart?

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | November 10, 2020

It’s over. Donald Trump is history For millions of Americans, it’s a time for celebration and relief. Trump’s cruelty, vindictiveness, non-stop lies, corruption, rejection of science, chaotic incompetence and gross narcissism brought out the worst in America. He tested the limits of American decency and democracy. He is the closest we have come to a … Continue reading »

Four strategies to combat disinformation before the election

Brandie Nonnecke, Founding Director, CITRIS Policy Lab | October 21, 2020

Earlier in October, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released its “Homeland Threat Assessment.” The report cautions that Russian and Chinese online influencers continue to employ coordinated campaigns to spread mis- and disinformation to amplify socio-political division and increase voter suppression. With the 2020 US presidential election in just two weeks, these tactics are likely to ramp up.

Don’t be scared. We can make America’s 2020 election results trustworthy

Philip Stark, professor of statistics | October 19, 2020

Regardless of what the polls suggest, Americans understand that our elections and democracy are under attack. And a power grab is still unfolding, marked by legal games, voter suppression, a crippled postal system and a politicized Supreme Court, which may decide a disputed election. Meanwhile, all electronic voting machines, whether directly connected to the internet or not, remain vulnerable to hacking and fraud. Despite these serious challenges, there is a way to make America’s 2020 election results trustworthy.