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Snap decisions and race

Claude Fischer, professor of sociology | January 9, 2015

One issue sparking off from the fiery debate around the police shootings of black men is the extent to which Americans simply react negatively to seeing black – whether it is a police officer making a life-and-death split-second decision about the threat a black man poses, a store clerk tracking a black customer in a … Continue reading »

The NAACP and the politics of race and regulation

Dan Farber, professor of law | January 29, 2013

There’s a bit of a kerfuffle going on about the NAACP’s defense of over-sized soft-drinks.  In an amicus brief challenging New York City’s new ban on the super-size, the NAACP (joined by the Hispanic Federation and an association of Korean grocers) takes a surprisingly libertarian stance against government regulation.  It laments that the ban is … Continue reading »

How others’ (and our) attitudes about race affect our health

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, professor of psychology | August 9, 2012

Health disparities across racial and ethnic groups suggest— but not conclusively— that discrimination affects your health. As a recent report from the American Psychological Association that I was a co-author on notes, minorities are far more susceptible to many diseases relative to majority groups, most notably heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. The data are as consistent … Continue reading »

Does White identity predict positive or negative attitudes towards diversity?

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, professor of psychology | March 6, 2012

In recent years, research on White identity has gained traction in the psychological literature, as researchers and clinicians have grown to realize that this group also struggles with questions such as, “what does it mean to be White in my culture,” and “what does being White mean to me?” One of the most interesting– and … Continue reading »

Jeremy Lin and racism? How subtle discrimination affects targets

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, professor of psychology | February 24, 2012

In last week’s post, I compared Jeremy Lin to Jackie Robinson, making the point that Lin might open doors for other Asian American athletes in pro sports. One reader, Angela, astutely pointed out that the analogy is problematic: “There was an actual structure preventing such players from participating, a structure that doesn’t exist for Asians … Continue reading »

Racial bias and bankruptcy: Implications for the 2012 election

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, professor of psychology | January 26, 2012

In the news this week, more evidence of discrimination under our seemingly egalitarian noses: A forthcoming study in the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies shows that lawyers are about twice as likely to steer blacks debtors filing for bankruptcy towards the harsher chapter 13 than they are other filers, whom they are more likely to … Continue reading »

Curbing LGBT teen bullying: Neutrality is not an option

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, professor of psychology | October 15, 2011

By guest blogger James Telesford, Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley Once, while wandering down Michigan Avenue in Chicago, I spotted two African American males walking out of the store next to me. They were wearing baggy jeans, hooded sweatshirts, and sneakers.  As I watched them, they started to hold hands, kissed, stepped into the … Continue reading »

Making the invisible visible: Campus Republicans’ bake sale

Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton, professor of psychology | September 26, 2011

As reported by CNN here, Berkeley’s campus Republicans are planning a bake sale with a sliding scale for payment, depending on the buyer’s gender and background. According to the organization’s president, “it’s really there to cause people to think more critically about what this kind of policy would do in university admissions.” The organization is protesting … Continue reading »