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Terrorism in Paris: hard lessons for soft borders

Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations | November 15, 2015

Terrorism in Paris is not France’s fault, it’s Europe’s fault. In less than three hours on the night of Friday 13 November 2015, seven men killed 129 people, wounded 352, mostly with small arms (their suicide explosives were used to martyr themselves at the end of their killing sprees). The Islamic State in Syria, Iraq, … Continue reading »

Performing destruction: cultural heritage, looting and ISIS

Katherine Kinkopf, Ph.D. student, anthropology | November 9, 2015

If you use Twitter or Facebook, you’ve likely seen hundreds of news articles, reports, videos, and blog posts on the violent destruction of cultural heritage that has intensified in Syria during the past few months. As an archaeologist, my news-feeds are always a-buzz with the latest updates on all things archaeology — but it’s not what … Continue reading »

How to defeat ISIS (and why it probably won’t happen)

Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations | March 2, 2015

Air strikes won’t defeat ISIS. A Western ground invasion would, but the West is far short of that commitment, to its increasing peril. ISIS (the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham; more transliterately known as the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL; most derogatively known by its Arabic acronym “Da’ish”) is an … Continue reading »

Diplomacy with Iran: A win-win situation

Mahmood Monshipouri, visiting associate professor, Middle Eastern Studies | November 18, 2014

It is easy to be cynical about diplomacy with Iran, considering the complexities of U.S. domestic politics and the relentless defiance that Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani faces from his own domestic hardliners.  We should not allow, however, conservative camps in either country to rock the diplomatic boat, much less sink it. Why? Because sanctions are … Continue reading »