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The Supreme Court just abdicated its most important role: enforcing the Constitution

Erwin Chemerinsky, Berkeley Law dean | June 28, 2019

“In a 5-4 decision, split along ideological lines, the court’s conservative majority acknowledged that partisan gerrymandering is “incompatible with democratic principles,” but it nonetheless said that the issue should be regarded as a “political question” and that federal courts thus lack jurisdiction to hear cases challenging it.”

Punishing school students for online speech

William Turner, Lecturer in media studies | December 4, 2017

On November 29, a San Francisco federal judge untangled a really messy “school speech” case and ruled that students who posted or praised racist Instagram comments were not protected by the First Amendment. Judge James Donato decided that although the online posts, including “likes,” were “speech” under the First Amendment, the out-of-school posts were subject … Continue reading »

Police shootings: How many more must perish before we see justice?

Stephanie Jones-Rogers, assistant professor of history | July 27, 2017

One year to the day that Dylann Roof murdered nine African Americans in Mother Emanuel Church in Charleston, South Carolina, a jury exonerated Jeronimo Yanez, the police officer who shot and killed Philando Castile. In African American communities around the country, few individuals were surprised at the verdict. More than anything, individuals expressed deeper sorrow and intensified disappointment because, once again, many of us held out hope that the justice system would hold the man who killed another human being accountable.

Manchester: The newest terrorism, and the future of terrorism

Bruce Newsome, Lecturer in International Relations | May 24, 2017

The suicide bombing of a concert in Manchester, England, is indicative of the latest trends in terrorism — trends that have emerged as recently as the last few years, and will continue in the wrong direction for years to come. The tragedy illustrates the new normal in terrorist motivations and behaviors; unfortunately, you would not … Continue reading »

No to Jeff Sessions, a southwest Alabama good ole boy

Nancy Scheper-Hughes, anthropology professor | January 31, 2017

This week Congress will  be vetting Jeff Sessions appointment as U.S. attorney general. It is unimaginable that Sessions could be empowered to represent “law, justice and the American way.” For most of his public career Sessions has represented white interests. Yesterday, representatives of the NAACP were arrested in Montgomery, Alabama, during a protest in which they … Continue reading »