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The seven biggest economic lies

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | October 14, 2011

The President’s Jobs Bill doesn’t have a chance in Congress — and the Occupiers on Wall Street and elsewhere can’t become a national movement for a more equitable society – unless more Americans know the truth about the economy. Here’s a short (2 minute 30 second) effort to rebut the seven biggest whoppers now being … Continue reading »

The Republican death wish

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | May 28, 2011

Forty Senate Republicans have now joined their colleagues in the House to support Paul Ryan’s plan that would turn Medicare into vouchers that funnel money to private health insurers. They thumbed their nose at the special election in upstate New York earlier this week that delivered a victory to Democrat Kathy Hochul, who made the … Continue reading »

Mr. President: Why Medicare isn’t the problem, it’s the solution

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | April 13, 2011

I hope when he tells America how he aims to tame future budget deficits the President doesn’t accept conventional Washington wisdom that the biggest problem in the federal budget is Medicare (and its poor cousin Medicaid). Medicare isn’t the problem. It’s the solution. The real problem is the soaring costs of health care that lie … Continue reading »

The Republican strategy

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | February 18, 2011

The Republican strategy is to split the vast middle and working class — pitting unionized workers against non-unionized, public-sector workers against non-public, older workers within sight of Medicare and Social Security against younger workers who don’t believe these programs will be there for them, and the poor against the working middle class. By splitting working America … Continue reading »

Is the public option essential for meaningful health reform?

Helen Halpin, professor of health policy | October 12, 2009

The four goals of offering the public option as part of health care reform are 1) to reduce administrative costs, 2) to create purchasing power, 3) to force private health insurance to compete with it, and 4) to give the American people a choice of a public or private health plans. The big questions are: who will be eligible? how big will the premium subsidies be? and will it be a national public option with all states participating? If a national public option is offered through a Federal Health Insurance Exchange, it has the potential to transform the US health care system to one that is more efficient, affordable, accessible, equitable and offers meaningful choices to high quality care for the American people.