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How public pre-K education for all can worsen racial disparities

Bruce Fuller, professor of education and public policy | April 22, 2021

President Biden will soon detail his promise of free access to preschool for all young children, and the idea polls high among the nation’s parents. But research shows that poor children benefit the most from pre-K. Shouldn’t we focus aid on their families?

Chauvin verdict a wakeup call for medicine and public health

Denise Herd, Professor, Behavioral Sciences | April 21, 2021

The case highlights the need to disrupt the systematic racism that creates the enormous health burdens on Black people, and other vulnerable populations, as well as the ideology of racial difference and inferiority that help sustain them.

This is Us. Urban density is our geopolitical destiny

Vishaan Chakrabarti, Dean of College of Environmental Design | November 9, 2020

In the days, weeks, and years ahead, we have much work to do. In our college, this work is particularly acute because geography is destiny, and our destiny is density. Red states and blue states? Fuggedaboutit! Elections in the United States are increasingly about our cities and the communities that enliven them.

The six most revealing moments from the presidential debate

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | October 1, 2020

The first presidential debate was as horrific as we feared it would be. We were barely able to hear a word from Joe Biden or moderator Chris Wallace, thanks to Trump’s incessant interruptions and nonstop insults. Here are the six most revealing moments:

Donald Trump has unified Americans — against him

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | July 20, 2020

Donald Trump is on the verge of accomplishing what no American president has ever achieved — a truly multi-racial, multi-class, bipartisan political coalition. Unfortunately for the president, the coalition opposes him.

Why we need to defund, not defend, the police

Nikki Jones, professor of African American Studies | July 1, 2020

Calls to defund the police ask us to imagine safety from the perspective of those who are the frequent targets of policing and understand that it is the world that is built from that perspective that will be a better world for us all.

Trump’s NAFTA replacement needs its tires kicked

Harley Shaiken, director, Center for Latin American Studies, professor in education and in geography | July 9, 2019

President Trump would like to see the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement ratified without delay. It’s a bit like a used car salesperson giving you 10 minutes to accept the deal of the century. You may want to look under the hood and test-drive the vehicle first. USMCA is largely an updated and rebranded version of the … Continue reading »

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s tax hike idea is not about soaking the rich

Gabriel Zucman, Assistant professor of economics | January 22, 2019

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has kick-started a much-needed debate about taxes. But the debate, so far, has been misplaced. It’s obvious that the affluent — who’ve seen their earnings boom since 1980 while their taxes fell — can contribute more to the public coffers. And given the revenue needs of the country, it is necessary.

But that’s not the fundamental reason higher top marginal income tax rates are desirable. Their root justification is not about collecting revenue. It is about regulating inequality and the market economy. It is also about safeguarding democracy against oligarchy.

Whitaker’s appointment is unconstitutional

John Yoo, law professor | November 14, 2018

President Donald Trump appointed Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general last week, despite the fact that he cannot legally hold the office. While the president could fix his mistake with any lesser official and in any normal time, the attorney general is no lesser official and this is no normal time. Whitaker takes office during … Continue reading »

It’s time to raise wages for care workers

Ken Jacobs, chair, UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education | May 29, 2018

If you have children, you have likely struggled to find affordable quality childcare. Many of us face the same struggle seeking home care for a loved one or ourselves. In both cases costs to consumers are often out of reach while wages for workers are too low to retain a trained, stable workforce. Ballot initiatives this year … Continue reading »

Vilified by Trump, DACA youth getting an ICEy reception across the country

Bruce Fuller, professor of education and public policy | April 5, 2018

This commentary is cross-posted from Education Week’s Commentary section, where Fuller regularly exchanges views with Lance Izumi. America’s high schools rarely offer a warm cocoon for our youths, secluded from pressing social ills. Neighborhood disparities deepen wide gaps in learning. The cowardice of pro-gun politicians leads to bloodshed inside classrooms. President Donald Trump chose Easter … Continue reading »

MLK: an enduring and great teacher

john a. powell, director, Othering & Belonging Institute | April 4, 2018

This is cross-posted from the Haas Institute Blog of the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society. This week people all across the world are pausing to acknowledge the incredible life and the tragic death of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I always deliberately include the “Reverend” in his title as we … Continue reading »

Lack of oversight puts Americans’ privacy at risk across entire tech, information industry

Jennifer King, Ph.D candidate in information science at UC Berkeley’s School of Information | March 20, 2018

As fallout from the revelation of Cambridge Analytica’s misuse of Facebook user information continues, many are mistakenly calling this incident a breach. Facebook is right to claim this incident was no breach — this is Facebook’s platform working exactly as designed. I know, because I too created a survey app on Facebook for the express purpose of … Continue reading »