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The Republicans of the Supreme Court

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | July 2, 2013

In order to fully understand what the five Republican appointees on the Supreme Court have been up to when they make decisions that affect our democracy, as they did last week on voting rights, you need to understand what the Republican Party has been up to. The modern GOP is based on an unlikely coalition … Continue reading »

The sequester and the Tea Party Plot

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | March 1, 2013

Imagine a plot to undermine the government of the United States, to destroy much of its capacity to do the public’s business, and to sow distrust among the population. Imagine further that the plotters infiltrate Congress and state governments, reshape their districts to give them disproportionate influence in Washington, and use the media to spread … Continue reading »

The death of climate legislation revisited

Dan Farber, professor of law | February 12, 2013

Why did the push for climate legislation fail even though Democrats controlled Congress and the White House in 2008-2010 ? Theda Skocpol, a Harvard political scientist, addressed this issue in a controversial recent paper.. Matt Kahn and I have both blogged before about her paper (here and here). Now that I’ve had a chance to read the 150-page article more … Continue reading »

The new Southern strategy

john a. powell, director, Othering & Belonging Institute | January 30, 2013

When President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, he told an aide that Democrats had “lost the South for a generation,” anticipating a white backlash in the South. Since the end of Reconstruction, the South had been dominated by the Democratic Party. The national party’s efforts to promote civil rights at the national … Continue reading »

How to never win another election

Robin Lakoff, professor emerita of linguistics | November 16, 2012

Suppose you have just been defeated in a tough political contest. Suppose further that it was one that, in your heart, you expected and felt entitled to win. Suppose in addition that most serious analysts attributed your loss, to a significant extent , to your antagonizing several key groups of voters: African Americans, women, Latinos, … Continue reading »

Why the GOP should embrace renewable energy and energy efficiency

Dan Farber, professor of law | November 13, 2012

There’s a lot of discussion these days about how the Republican Party should reposition itself in light of last week’s election results.  Support for renewables and energy efficiency would make sense as part of a package of policy adjustments — it would strengthen the Party’s appeal to swing voters, women, and younger voters, with only … Continue reading »

How Romney keeps lying through his big white teeth

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | August 30, 2012

“We’re not going to let our campaign be dictated by fact-checkers,” says Neil Newhouse, a Romney pollster. A half dozen fact-checking organizations and websites have refuted Romney’s claims that Obama removed the work requirement from the welfare law and will cut Medicare benefits by $716 billion. Last Sunday’s New York Times even reported on its … Continue reading »

Three lessons from Mitt Romney about bullying

Jeremy Adam Smith, Editor, Greater Good Magazine | May 14, 2012

Last week, the Washington Post reported that presumptive GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney was a bully in high school. The most serious incident, reconstructed from interviews with both witnesses and perpetrators, involved chasing down a student thought to be gay and pinning him to the ground. Romney, who witnesses say was the ringleader, then took … Continue reading »

What Republicans argue when they have nothing left to say

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | March 20, 2012

Republicans are desperate. They can’t attack Obama on jobs because the jobs picture is improving. Their attack on the Administration’s rule requiring insurers to cover contraception has backfired, raising hackles even among many Republican women. Their attack on Obama for raising gas prices has elicited scorn from economists of all persuasions who know oil prices … Continue reading »

Republican Agonistes: After Michigan

Lawrence Rosenthal, executive director, Center for Right-Wing Studies | March 1, 2012

The narrowness of Mitt Romney’s victory over Rick Santorum in Romney’s home state of Michigan ensures that the ever more scathing struggle for the Republican nomination is far from resolved. In 2010 the Tea Party established that it owned a chokehold on the Republican nominating process by way of its outsized representation as participants in … Continue reading »

Why no responsible Democrat should want Newt Gingrich to get the GOP nomination

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | January 27, 2012

Republicans are worried sick about Newt Gingrich’s ascendance, while Democrats are tickled pink. Yet no responsible Democrat should be pleased at the prospect that Gingrich could get the GOP nomination. The future of America is too important to accept even a small risk of a Gingrich presidency. The Republican worry is understandable. “The possibility of … Continue reading »

The youthful magic of Ron Paul

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | January 12, 2012

South Carolina Republican Senator Jim DeMint, the darling of the Tea Party wing nuts of the GOP, is urging Republican candidates to listen to Ron Paul. “One of the things that’s hurt the so-called conservative alternative is saying negative things about Ron Paul,” DeMint told conservative radio host Laura Ingraham. “I’d like to see a … Continue reading »

The GOP ticket in 2012: Romney-Rubio

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | January 3, 2012

Since my New Year’s prediction that Obama would select Hillary Clinton for his running mate in 2012 (and Joe Biden would become Secretary of State), I’ve been swamped by requests for my GOP prediction. Here goes. You can forget the caucuses and early primaries. Mitt Romney will be the nominee. Republicans may be stupid but … Continue reading »

Why the Republican crackup is bad for America

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | December 22, 2011

Two weeks before the Iowa caucuses, the Republican crackup threatens the future of the Grand Old Party more profoundly than at any time since the GOP’s eclipse in 1932. That’s bad for America. The crackup isn’t just Romney the smooth versus Gingrich the bomb-thrower. Not just House Republicans who just scotched the deal to continue … Continue reading »

The Wall Street occupiers and the Democratic Party

Robert Reich, professor of public policy | October 11, 2011

Will the Wall Street Occupiers morph into a movement that has as much impact on the Democratic Party as the Tea Party has had on the GOP? Maybe. But there are reasons for doubting it. Tea Partiers have been a mixed blessing for the GOP establishment – a source of new ground troops and energy … Continue reading »

Reality resurfacing in California

Michael O'Hare, professor of public policy | January 18, 2011

Jerry Brown has issued a budget that engages a $25b deficit.  Note the word engages; not “papers over” or “hides with wishful thinking” or “lies about”; engages. There’s plenty of work not done yet, but this is huge: for the first time in recent memory, our elected chief executive is telling us the truth. Not … Continue reading »